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Price List (per course)

Individual: 4-CEUs $140
Group Rate: 3 or more $120 (pp)

Individual: 3-CEUs $105
Group Rate: 3 or more $95 (pp)

Individual: 2-CEUs $75

Course Offerings

Weathering Our Childhood
Description

Attachment Theories offer an ethological approach to social and personality development. These theories propose that evolutionary forces have endowed infants with genes that predispose them to form emotional bonds with their caregivers. In this module, emphasis will be placed on the significance of early childhood relationships. Further focus will be given to clinical treatment, case management, child welfare and protective services to individuals and families within the continuum of the social work field.

Learning Objectives

  • Define Attachment Theory
  • Define Ethology
  • Apply attachment theory in the context of typical child development
  • Apply attachment theory in the context of early childhood education and school socialization
  • Apply attachment theory in the context of child maltreatment
  • Identify the (4) phases of attachment as defined by John Bowlby
  • Identify the (2) forms of attachment as defined by Mary Ainsworth
  • Identify the (4) categories of attachment as defined by Mary Ainsworth
  • Compare and contrast Object Relations and Attachment Theories
  • Apply attachment theory as it relates to early and adult interpersonal relationships
Guides for Our Moral Compass

Description

Cognitive and Developmental Learning Theories, a body of theories that emphasize mental aspects of development (i.e. logic and memory). Emphasis will be placed on theories of operational learning, psycho-social stages of development, ethics of justice and moral reasoning. Participants will be able to apply these concepts to garner a more holistic understanding of the typical child development in the context of social work practice with children and families.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the (4) stages (sensori-motor, pre-operational, concrete operational, formal operational) of Piaget’s Cognitive Developmental theory.
  • Define the (4) stages (sensori-motor, pre-operational, concrete operational, formal operational) of Piaget’s Cognitive Developmental theory.
  • Define Egocentrism in the context of children’s ability or inability to differentiate between two points of view, and how this concept applies to their comprehension of family dynamics (conflict, roles, interpersonal relationships).
  • Define Moral Reasoning as articulated by Kohlberg’s theory on Moral Reasoning.
  • Identify the specific (6) stages of moral development that constitute Kohlberg’s Theory on Moral Reasoning.
  • Identify the (3) structural levels that constitute Kohlberg’s theory on Moral Reasoning.
  • Identify the implications of cognitive and moral development to human behavior and social work practice.
Heal Thyself

Description

Compassion Fatigue: Heal Thyself explores how vicarious stress and trauma can impact a clinician’s emotional health. Consideration is given to the importance of being mindful of one’s personal wellbeing. If we are compromised with stress and experience “burn-out,” we potentially place our clients at risk of receiving less than quality support. Focus will be placed on identifying signs of secondary trauma and self-care strategies for stress reduction. Lastly, the efficacy of these integral therapy practices as a part of stress reduction for patients in clinical treatment will be considered in conjunction with other psychodynamic and behavioral modalities.

Learning Objectives

  • Define Compassion Fatigue also known as secondary trauma.
  • Identify the signs of “burn-out.”
  • Identify self-care strategies (mindfulness, meditation, breathing and progressive muscle relaxation).
  • Recognize ways to draw healthy boundaries.
  • Identify ways to advocate for your professional and personal needs in the workplace.
  • Course will provide tools of mindfulness, meditation and relaxed breathing as ways to minimize negative impact of compassion fatigue.
The Lifecycle is Not Static But Rather a Dynamic Process

Description

The Developmental Life Course Perspective provides a unique framework for understanding individual lifespan development anchored within the social, political, and historical context. Salient themes are—historical timing of life events and transitions, facets of human agency and self-determination. From this angle, the multidimensional aspects of human development will be examined.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the relevance of the Developmental Life Course Perspective (DLCP) to Social Work Practice
  • Identify the Five Key Concepts (cohorts, transitions, trajectories, life events, turning points) of DLCP
  • Define each of the (5) Key Concepts of DLCP and its relevance to human development.
  • Identify specific issues related to the biological, social, psychological and economic aspects of human development over the life course.
  • Identify healthy behaviors used to cope with traumatic life events (ex. grief/loss, mental/medical illness) over the life course.
  • Identify maladaptive behaviors used to cope with traumatic life events (ex. grief/loss, mental/medical illness) over the life course.
  • Identify Risk and Protective Factors as it pertains to life transitions between childhood, adolescence and adulthood.
  • Identify interventions that have been proven to be effective in working with clients in crisis.
A Holistic Perspective Challenging The Age Old Debate of Nature vs. Nurture

Description

Ecological Theory provides a holistic perspective for understanding the environmental conditions that stimulate or thwart individual development (i.e. person-in-environment fit) and behavior across the life span (i.e. poverty, class, policy, discrimination). Practitioners will explore how environmental conditions can promote or inhibit development and behavior. Specific emphasis will be placed on issues of socio-economic status (i.e. poverty, class), discrimination, and oppression. Practitioners will consider effective strategies in their professional settings to promote economic and social justice.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify how environmental, socio-economic, cultural, political factors shape and influence human behavior and development over the life span.
  • Identify the (5) subsystems (micro, mezzo, exo, macro, chrono-systems) as articulated by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological theory.
  • Define (5) subsystems (micro, mezzo, exo, macro, chrono-systems) as articulated by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological theory.
  • Identify the impact of inequality as it relates to the economic and social determinants of health (mental/medical) over the life span.
  • Identify social and mental health interventions to remediate the impact of inequality.
  • Apply ecological theory as framework for conceptualizing how people (client-hood) grapple with poverty, community violence/trauma, and environmental stressors across the life-span.
  • Identify environmental conditions that promote or inhibit development and behavior (i.e. poverty, class, discrimination, and oppression, and to recognize the necessity of promoting economic and social justice).
Quality vs. Quantity

Description

The Impact of Health Care Reform on Social Work: Quality vs. Quantity explores the implications of healthcare policy on social work practice. This course offers a comprehensive review of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) within the context of medical and mental health service delivery. Among the issues explored are: health insurance reform, cost-containment and limitations. Participants will be able to evaluate the impact of ACA’s new integrated health care models, which mandate participating exchange programs to cover behavioral health care, expanded role of health homes in providing inpatient care to those diagnosed with chronic mental illness, and the shift to community-based mental health services. Practitioners will also learn how to decode common healthcare jargon into simplified terms such that they can help educate their clients and effectively advocate on their behalf.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the key concepts and regulations delineated by the ACA.
  • Evaluate the financial stipulations that MHPAEA (2008) places on health insurance issuers/managed care providers within the domains of medical and behavioral health services.
  • Define Health Outcomes.
  • Define how Access-to-Healthcare is measured.
  • Evaluate Quality of Care as it pertains to: competent care, medical negligence, and the capitation and reimbursement system.
  • Identify Clinical Practice Guidelines.
  • Identify the challenges faced by the underinsured as it pertains to: insurance deductibles and copayments, gaps in Medicare coverage, lack of coverage for long-term care.
  • Articulate the terms and conditions of the Individual Mandate to obtain health insurance benefits.
The Two Faces of Love

Description

Intimate Partner Violence: The Two Faces of Love provides a post-structural view of abuse across, cultural and social norms, gender and sexual orientation. Drawing from a psychodynamic perspective, the practitioner will be able to cast a more holistic and nuanced understanding of IPV. Moreover, participants will be able to strengthen their assessment skills— identify the signs of abuse, consider evidenced-based clinical models for treating affected populations, such as trauma-focused therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy; and ascertain legal and advocacy resources.

Learning Objectives

  • Define Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Identify at-risk populations whom are affected by IPV.
  • Identify prevalence rates.
  • Identify age of onset of both victim and perpetrator (i.e. developmental stage of life at victimization, including but not limited to: stalking, physical abuse, rape).
  • Identify and recognize the Warning Signs of Abuse Define the 4-types of abuse (physical, sexual, emotional and economic).
  • Identify the challenges and obstacles of abuse (not limited to: psychological and economic entrapment, physical isolation and lack of social support, immigration status, religious belief system).
  • Identify ways to assess for trauma and risk factors for IPV.
  • Identify Interventions and Resources (counseling, health and wellness, legal and advocacy services).
The Human Experience is Potent and Can Shape Gene Expression

Description

Interpersonal Neurobiology: A New Perspective provides a framework for understanding the contributions of brain development to human behavior (i.e. cognitive, emotional development, reasoning). Emphasis is placed on neuroplasticity, early vulnerabilities in child brain development, executive functioning, memory recall, interpersonal relationships, and impact of trauma across the life course. Practitioners will be able to consider and appreciate how experiences shape gene expression. Specific emphasis will be placed on how traumatic life events (i.e. abuse, exposure to violence, complicated grief/loss) can be a risk-factor for developing symptoms of psychopathology (anxiety, depression, PTSD, substance abuse). Practitioners will be able to identify methods for ameliorating the long-term effects of trauma.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify four quintessential perspectives pertaining to how early experiences contribute to brain development
  • Identify the key structures (higher, central, lower, hind) of the brain.
  • Define the functions of the key structures (higher, central, lower, hind) of the brain.
  • Apply concepts of Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB) to how experiences influence Parent-Child Relationships
  • Define Neuroplasticity
  • Identify the implications of neuroscience and brain development on social work practice.
  • Define and identify Epigenetic Factors—the ways in which specific experiences directly influences how genes are expressed.
  • Define Susceptibility in the context of how certain early experiences (supportive and neglectful) significantly prepare or deter young children from developing effective capacities (executive functioning) to regulate their behavior.
  • Define Memory recall (implicit/explicit memory) and how this function contributes to human behavior in the context of healthy and traumatic life experiences.
  • Identify healthy and maladaptive mechanisms in the context of coping and adapting to life crises.
One Cannot Resolve What Is Not Acknowledged

Description

Oppression Theories provide a framework for understanding power and privilege and the intersectionality of class, race, gender, self and group identity within the context of social work practice. Reflective exercise will be offered such that participants can begin to explore personal biases and stereotypes that can affect the understanding of human behavior and dynamic in the practitioner-client relationship. Readings from Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed will be introduced as a framework for understanding oppression on a systemic level (macro) and in the context on the practitioner-client relationship (micro).

Learning Objectives

  • Define social justice, economic security, equality as well as oppression.
  • Identify the (7) core concepts as posited by Paulo Freire.
  • Define the term ‘praxis’ as conceptualized by Paulo Freire.
  • Apply Freirian thought as a catalyst for change within multi-social system levels (i.e. the practitioners’ organization, social policy, government institutions, etc.)
  • Identify the role(s) played by human behavior in the social environment.
  • Identify ways clients, social workers, social agencies and social movements can promote justice and equality and to assuage oppression.
  • Identify the impact of privilege and oppression and the potential power dynamics of race, sex, class, heteronormativity, ability, age, and religion in the context of how the dynamics of oppression impact the human developmental process.
  • Explore personal biases and stereotypes that can affect the understanding of human behavior and change and the practitioner-client relationship.
Description

Prelude to Advance Care Planning and Bioethics explores advance directives and ways to support patient self-determination through the application of medical ethics. As Social Workers, we often play an integral role on multi-disciplinary teams. As a profession, we are well suited to be mediators when there is a difference of opinion between doctor and patient.

Learning Objectives

  • Review the origins of Bioethics
  • Consider the ethical challenges
  • Identify and define four (4) key principles of medical ethics (patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, distributive justice).
  • Identify Stages of Bioethics Mediation
  • Consider the role of social workers as mediators in the healthcare setting
We Are A Reflection Of Our Family

Description

Psycho-social Development and Family Systems Theory provides a framework for understanding human behavior in the context of the social environment and family systems. Participants will explore how psychological and social content shape the human experience. Erik Erikson’s Psycho-social Stages of Development Theory will be reviewed as a framework for practitioners to understand the role of early relationships, culture, age, in personality development across the life-span. From an Eriksonian perspective, emphasis will be placed on how core childhood stages influence the foundation of adult personality. Murray Bowen’s (Bowenian) Family Systems Theory will be offered as a model for understanding the family emotional system. Participants will learn how to apply these theories in the context of providing clinical treatment and concrete social services to children and families.

Learning Objectives

  • Define Family Systems Theory according to Murray Bowen.
  • Identify the (3) concepts that make up the ‘Family Projection Process’ according to Bowen.
  • Identify the (4) stages of the’ Nuclear Family Emotional System’ according to Bowen.
  • Define the ‘Societal Emotional Process’ according to Bowen.
  • Identify (8) stages of psycho-social development according to Erik Erikson.
  • Compare and contrast theoretical approaches (i.e. Murray Bowen and Erik Erikson) to understanding the psychodynamics of family and interpersonal relationships across the life span.
  • Apply concepts of Family Systems Theory in the context of alleviating family tension and conflict in professional practice.
  • Apply concepts of Psycho-social Development Theory in the context of providing clinical interventions and social services to children and families in professional practice.
Our Truth Is Locked In Our Unconscious

Description

Psychodynamic Theories (i.e. ego psychology, object relations) are presented as a lens for understanding personality development and human behavior spanning across childhood and adulthood. Emphasis is placed on ‘unconscious drives’ and ‘early experiences’ as motivations for human behavior across the life course. Focus is also placed on temperament and the quality of the parent-child relationship (i.e. goodness-of-fit). Implications of psychodynamic concepts to clinical social work practice will be underscored, specific to supportive counseling and psychoanalytic treatment methods.

Learning Objectives

  • Define Psychodynamic Theory
  • Identify Psychoanalytic Theories (such as object relations, ego psychology) that are practiced in clinical social work
  • Compare and contrast psychodynamic theories of human development
  • Identify (3) significant constructs (id, ego, superego) of Freud’s Theory on Personality Development
  • Define Drive Theory
  • Identify the (2) significant concept (unconscious forces and early experiences) that are core to psychoanalytic thought
  • Apply psychodynamic concepts to clinical social work practice
Power To The People

Description

Social Construction Theory provides a framework for understanding individuals, groups, families, communities and organizations. In this module, emphasis is placed on theories of empowerment and the role of the social work advocate. Specific attention is drawn to how social work professionals can leverage/effect change within the context of groups, families, organizations and communities. The impact of inequality on differences in gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, and implications for the professional social work advocate to ameliorate these inequities will be addressed. Practitioners will consider best advocacy strategies and practice methods for meeting clients’ diverse needs.

Learning Objectives

  • Define Social Construction Theory.
  • Apply principles of empowerment theory to social work practice.
  • Identify ways in which individual/client(s) can effect change in their community through advocacy.
  • Identify ways that the professional social work advocate can provide interventions within multiple levels (groups, organizations, community).
  • Apply concepts of social construction theory to their unique professional areas (i.e. clinical practice, programming, administration, community organizing, social policy).
  • Identify the role and significance of diversity and its impact on human development, behavior and values, especially relating to differences in gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, vulnerable and at-risk populations.
  • Consider best practice methods for meeting clients’ diverse needs.
Bioethical Issues and End-of-Life Decisions

Description

Bioethical Issues and End-of-Life Decisions explores two different approaches to medical ethics—one based on the application of ethical principles to individual cases, the other based on case-by-case analysis. Practitioners will consider how we can use medical ethics in the formulation of health policy. Moreover, attention will be given to the following: the role of social workers as mediators when there is a difference of opinion between doctor and patient; and ways to support and facilitate patient self-determination.

Learning Objectives

  • Define Health according to the World Health Organization (WHO)
  • Review the origins of Bioethics
  • Identify the emergent issues of Bioethics
  • Identify the philosophical and health management issues facing End- of-Life care
  • Identify and consider the proverbial questions and challenges presented by medical innovations
  • Consider the ethical challenges
  • Identify and define four (4) key principles of medical ethics (patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, distributive justice).
  • Identify the seven (7) Stages of Bioethics Mediation (Assessment and preparation, Beginning the Mediation, Presenting and Refining the Medical Facts, Gathering Information, Problem-solving, Resolution, Follow-up).
  • Consider the role of social workers as mediators in the healthcare setting

Featured Courses

10:00 am
The Impact of Health Care Reform on Social Work: Quality vs. Quantity About This NYSED Social Work Board Approved Workshop (4-CEUs) NYSED Social Work Board Approved Certificate will be awarded upon completing both sessions. The Impact of Health Care Reform on Social Work explores the implications of healthcare policy on social work practice. This course offers[...]
Integra Managed Long Term Care
Renew Perspectives, LCSW, PC is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for Licensed Social Workers #0026.